Steve Spurrier Drunk? So What

Steve Spurrier is Still
Crazy After All These Years

Some say Steve Spurrier was a little schnockered on his weekly TV show following the Gamecocks’ win on Oct. 5 over Central Florida. Watch this snippet, and draw your own conclusion:

When he was asked by a reporter if he was impaired on the show, the Head Ball Coach said, “I hope not.”

And here’s what he had to say when asked if he had been drinking after the game:

“Whether or not I have a few beers after every game for the past 29 years I don’t think I need to get into all that. Most coaches that I know we probably do have a few beers after ballgames after building up all week and so forth.”

Is that classic Steve Spurrier or what?

The Head Ball Coach is a legend, and he’s a rock star at the same time. Not a lot of people fit into that category. And part of the reason he is in the position he’s in is because of his candor (or call it what you will, depending on how much he has beaten your team). Nobody really cares — or should care — if he threw back a few after the game. He probably should film the show first, but I digress.

Come on. Have you ever been to Orlando for the day with a bunch of kids? I know plenty of adults who need to take the edge off following a trip to the “happiest place on earth” — which is a relative term to say the least.

Steve would make a terrible politician, wouldn’t he.

Reporter: “Congressman Spurrier, have you ever accepted bribe money from the tobacco lobby?”

Steve: “Whether or not I did that for the past 29 years, I don’t think I need to get into that.”

That’s exactly what he would say, and dang it, I kind of appreciate that. We could learn a lot from Steve Spurrier. If you do it, own it. And convert 4th and 15 against who doesn’t like it. We need more terrible politicians like that.

Until next time,
Give me 20, slackers!
Coach Billy Jack Hoover
@coachbillyj

Breaking down The Clowney Effect

Don’t be afraid. I promise not to make any bad puns using Jadeveon Clowney’s name. Of course that may or may not be because I can’t think of one that I haven’t already heard, but I digress. Instead, I’m going to get all original and coin a brand new phrase called the Clowney Effect.

Simply put, the Clowney Effect is when you have one of something when you really need two. For instance:

clackers

Clacker toy. Or should I say Slacker Toy?

  • Clackers (Are you old enough to remember clackers? Worst toy ever. Slacker toy.)
  • Shoes
  • Properly inflated bicycle tires
  • All-American linebackers

Consider this. Against Georgia, Clowney was on the field for 78 percent of the Gamecocks’ defensive plays. Yet, when he was in the game, Georgia averaged 8.3 yards per play, compared to 2.8 yards when he was on the sideline. Moreover, when he was on the field, the Bulldogs had 17 plays of more than 10 yards. When he was on the bench, they had two.

After the game, a frustrated Clowney exhibited shades of the Manziel Effect (running of the mouth) when he told reporters he had asked to be moved around where Georgia couldn’t continually run away from him. I’m sorry No. 7, your teammates on the other side have to keep that from happening. And on Saturday, they let you down.

So listen to me, young quarterbacks and aspiring coaches. When you see Jadeveon Clowney lined up on one side, you run the play to the other side every single time – every single stinking time. As in, “Hey defense, we’re going this-a-way, and Clowney can’t catch us on a motorcycle.” It makes coaching sound easy doesn’t it?

Of course, it doesn’t hurt to have a 4-wheel-drive truck at running back either. And that is what you call the Gurley Effect and not too many teams have that.

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